Ancient Greek - Saronic Islands, Aegina AR Stater, c. 457-350 BC, NGC XF (4/2)

or

13.32 grams / 21mm / Silver

Obv. Land tortoise with segmented shell, seen from above

Rev. Incuse 5-part square with skew pattern.

Aegina (/ˈnə/; Greek: Αίγινα, Aígina [ˈeʝina], Ancient Greek: Αἴγῑνα) is one of the Saronic Islands of Greece in the Saronic Gulf, 27 kilometres (17 miles) from Athens. Tradition derives the name from Aegina the mother of the hero Aeacus, who was born on the island and became its king. During ancient times Aegina was a rival of Athens, the great sea power of the era.

The fact that the Aeginetic standard of weights and measures (developed during the mid-7th century) was one of the two standards in general use in the Greek world (the other being the Euboic-Attic) is sufficient evidence of the early commercial importance of the island. The Aeginetic weight standard of about 12.3 grams was widely adopted in the Greek world during the 7th century BC. The Aeginetic stater was divided into three drachmae of 4.1 grams of silver. Staters depicting a sea-turtle were struck up to the end of the 5th century BC. Following the end of the Peloponnesian War, 404 BC, it was replaced by the land tortoise. (wikipedia)



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